Colorado dad saves 2-year-old son from ‘dry drowning’ after learning about Texas boy’s tragic death

Garon Vega was able to save his two-year-old son from "dry drowning" after seeing news about a recent case that took another young boy’s life.

A Colorado father is grateful the family of a Texas 4-year-old, who tragically died from “dry drowning,” shared their story he said saved his son’s life.

Staff Sgt. Garon Vega noticed his 2-year-old son Gio became sick after swallowing water from a community pool Wednesday.

The boy then developed a fever and a cough, prompting his family to look up symptoms online when they came across Frankie Delgado’s story.

“I’m noticing his heart is beating really fast, so noticeably that I can feel it when he’s lying against my body,” Vega told KTRK-TV.

Garon Vega was able to save his two-year-old son from "dry drowning" after seeing news about a recent case that took another young boy’s life.

Vega took his son to the hospital where doctors told him he was drowning and had fluid in his lungs.

"The X-rays did show he had a significant amount of water in his lungs, and it was a good thing that we brought him in because if we hadn’t, he wouldn’t have made it through the night,” Vega told the TV station.

Frankie, 4, of Houston, died days later after going swimming. Doctors told his parents they found fluids in his lungs and that he died from a condition called “dry drowning.”

Frankie Delgado, 4, died of dry drowning almost a week after a family trip to the Texas City Dike. Frankie’s parents Tara and Francisco Delgado Jr.

The Delgados have since urged parents to be aware of their children after they’ve left the water.

Vega said he’s thankful the Delgados have shared their story, if not, his son wouldn’t have survived.

“Their little boy saved our little boy’s life,” he told KTRK. “There was a purpose.”

Frankie Delgado, 4, died of dry drowning almost a week after a family trip to the Texas City Dike.

The Center for Disease Control doesn’t differentiate between “wet” or “dry” drowning. The agency says drowning is, “the process of experiencing respiratory impairment from submersion/immersion in liquid."

Some symptoms of "dry drowning" include coughing, chest pain, trouble breathing and fatigue.

Source Article

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked*